A Home-made Toy Motor-boat

 

jchismar.com toy motor boatThe Toy Motor-boat is the first project I completed for my exhibit at the Newark Maker Faire. I wanted to test the boat before I posted and I was slow finding an appropriate time and location to do so. The delay was, in part, because I wasn’t sure it would float let alone propel itself on water. I needed to find a private location with easy accessibility to the water.
jchismar toy motor boat

To build the motor-boat I cut a pine 2 x 4 into the shape of a boat (steps 1 and 2). Using the table saw I trimmed long thin strips from the  2 x 4 and glued them to the sides and back of the boat (step 3). After I painted the inside of the boat (step 4) I realized the stern of the boat was supposed to be angled forward, not straight up and down. I cut off the stern at the appropriate angle and replaced the wood. Step 5 shows the top of the bow being planed from a piece of the 2 x 4. The top of the bow was glued and clamped to the body of the boat in Step 6.  When the glue was dry I sanded everything and completed the exterior painting.

This boat is propelled by rubber bands stretched underneath the boat which are attached to a “tin” propeller. I was certain when the propeller was wound and placed in water the propeller would release all the rubber band energy in one quick burst, much like it does holding it in the air, creating a splash behind a stationary boat. That is if the 2 x 4 boat didn’t capsize before then.

Testing day arrived. Alone, I drove to Branch Brook Park and parked near the Prudential Concert Grove. I grabbed the camera and my motor-boat and sat at the water between Karl Ritter’s lions and anxiously wound the propeller. In my right hand I held the fueled up boat, the camera in my left. Chimes sounded from the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart as I prepared to be soaked while releasing the boat. At first I thought something was wrong, there was no revving sound or splashing. Then the boat slowly moved away, the propeller turning at a moderate rate.

The propeller rotated almost a minute pushing the boat about fifteen feet against the wind and current. It may have gone further if I paid more attention to releasing slack on the return line. What a surprising outcome! To be sure it really happened I tried a few more times, just as successful as the first. It was time to get ready for work so the testing wrapped up quickly. Otherwise the better part of the day would have been spent sitting by the water playing with the home-made toy.

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