Mize Mini-Mize Whirligig Automata Pegasus

Mize ME07J Mechanic Series jchismar

As you probably figured by now, I can’t sit still. Yes, I have a zillion started projects in my workshop and plans for more in my mind and hard drive. I may get around to finishing some of these projects but I have such little time! I’m not a humongous fan of 3d printing and laser/cnc cut stuff, but every once in a while I scratch the creative itch and dabble with this sort of thing.

I decided to purchase a mini automata whirligig kit manufactured by Mize, based in South Korea, online for $21.00 including shipping. There wasn’t a whole lot of information about this item in the description, but judging from the single image of the item it looked like it was going to be small. The package arrived from South Korea and I thought it was a thick holiday card, roughly 6″ x 9″ x .75″.

Mize Mini-Mize Pegasus Instructions

I opened the package and looked at the instructions. Yup, as assumed all the instructions are in Korean. Not a problem though because the images tend to explain everything clearly (enough). Curious, however, I photographed the instructions and uploaded them to i2ocr to translate. I don’t think it translated too well. Here’s a few selections from the translation:

  • The city is divided into cities
  • Excessive stress on the stomach can damage it
  • You have to do the complexion
  • I want to be a transit agent, too.
  • Sennepusa Seeking Confession | Do not be sick
  • The lungs are soaring
  • Even if I left you, I would like you to be my best friend

For real. I can’t make this stuff up.

jchismar mize pegasus translated

Lucky for me I work with Heeman, a talented Korean designer. Heeman was kind enough to translate the pertinent information in the image above. Thanks!

jchismar Mini Mize Pegasus

jchismar wood automata gears
A few gears from the project

Above are the three panels of parts that create the project.  Along with the instructions this is everything in the package. Excited, I retrieved my Loctite Go2 Glue, a toothpick and a paper towel. I reviewed the assembly instructions for the first few parts. I carefully removed the necessary parts from the panels by first scoring each sprue (the little piece of material holding the part in pace on the panel) with an Exacto, then carefully nudging the part free.  After test fitting the parts together I squeezed a small puddle of glue on a scrap of paper, applied a small amount of glue to the joints with a toothpick and reassembled.

The image at the top of the post displays the assembled crank box and completed project. This was an enjoyable and easy project to build. It’s important to be patient and clamp the pieces together (when possible) as you wait for the glue to cure between steps. I’ll admit, when I was attaching the pegasus to the gearbox, pretty much the last step, I carelessly broke the propeller off the gearbox. Luckily a dab of super glue came to the rescue and worked flawlessly.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t say the pegasus whirligig is not suitable for prolonged outdoor use. The material is MDF or something similar. I am surprised at how smoothly the mechanics operate because the drive shafts are simply square cut MDF material positioned in round holes. Birthday cake candles are provided in the kit. These are used to lubricate the moving parts. The lubrication the candles provide also works much better than I anticipated. The video clip below is of the complete kit operating outside in relatively gentle gusts of wind. Most likely I will be purchasing more of these Mize kits in the near future.

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